How to Submit Your Photo or Story

We want YOU to follow Julia’s recipe with us and share your stories and photos here. We want to know the where, what, when, why and how—of serving, eating, and enjoying too.

There are two ways to share your experiences cooking Julia Child’s recipes.

1. TEXT ONLY: Email your stories to juliachildrecipes@tumblr.com.

2. TEXT, PHOTOS, VIDEO: You can submit your story, photo, and/or video using this online form.

About

Julia Child (1912-2004) introduced French cuisine and cooking techniques to the American mainstream through her cookbooks and television programs.

Note: The museum posted new recipes from Julia's canon each week during August-December 2009. While we've stopped adding new recipes, we hope that you'll still cook, eat, and share your experiences with us on this site. Bon appétit!

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26 October 09

Submitted by Garlic

Finding and using the correct tools in cooking really helps to make food taste great. This Garlic Mashed Potato recipe and Potato Pancake recipe sound delicious. Also, using the clarified butter assures that the potato pancakes will not burn while making a perfect golden brown crust. Have a wonderful day!

19 October 09
Recipe #9: Stuffed duck, baked cucumbers, and blackberry flan
This week’s recipe for the Pâté de Canard en Croûte covers 7 pages in Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. 1. This is certainly not a record for a Julia Child recipe (French bread covers 22 pages) but, based on this alone, the recipe could be considered daunting to any cook. What are we saying? A recipe that requires deboning a duck, preparing stuffing, sewing the stuffing into the duck, making a pastry crust, wrapping the duck in the pastry, and then decorating it with pastry cut-outs, is daunting! However, Julia provides detailed written instructions and clear illustrations so that anyone will know exactly how to accomplish the simplest and most complicated dishes in her cookbooks. “You’ve got all the directions and if you can read, you can cook,” she wrote.
These are some of the trussing needles Julia kept in a drawer along with other small tools and gadgets. Although she used the “French needle and string system” for trussing poultry, she recognized there were many ways to tie a chicken together to prevent it from falling apart during cooking. She advised using any system that appealed, and if cooks didn’t have a proper trussing needle, they could use “a sailmaker’s needle, a mattress needle, or a knitting needle with a hole bored in one end.” From Julia Child’s Kitchen, pp. 219-20.
Kudos to this week’s contributors, project manager Ann Burrola and her friend Lucinda, who not only prepared Pâté de Canard en Croûte (Boned Stuffed Duck Baked in a Pastry Crust), but also made baked cucumbers AND blackberry flan.
READ THE FULL POST ON OUR BLOG for recipe sourcesSUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS AND STORIES—Posted by the National Museum of American History

Recipe #9: Stuffed duck, baked cucumbers, and blackberry flan

This week’s recipe for the Pâté de Canard en Croûte covers 7 pages in Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. 1. This is certainly not a record for a Julia Child recipe (French bread covers 22 pages) but, based on this alone, the recipe could be considered daunting to any cook. What are we saying? A recipe that requires deboning a duck, preparing stuffing, sewing the stuffing into the duck, making a pastry crust, wrapping the duck in the pastry, and then decorating it with pastry cut-outs, is daunting! However, Julia provides detailed written instructions and clear illustrations so that anyone will know exactly how to accomplish the simplest and most complicated dishes in her cookbooks. “You’ve got all the directions and if you can read, you can cook,” she wrote.

These are some of the trussing needles Julia kept in a drawer along with other small tools and gadgets. Although she used the “French needle and string system” for trussing poultry, she recognized there were many ways to tie a chicken together to prevent it from falling apart during cooking. She advised using any system that appealed, and if cooks didn’t have a proper trussing needle, they could use “a sailmaker’s needle, a mattress needle, or a knitting needle with a hole bored in one end.” From Julia Child’s Kitchen, pp. 219-20.

Kudos to this week’s contributors, project manager Ann Burrola and her friend Lucinda, who not only prepared Pâté de Canard en Croûte (Boned Stuffed Duck Baked in a Pastry Crust), but also made baked cucumbers AND blackberry flan.

READ THE FULL POST ON OUR BLOG for recipe sources

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS AND STORIES

—Posted by the National Museum of American History

5 October 09

Delicious Mushrooms!

Submitted by disneybear

21 September 09
Recipe #6: Sautéed Mushrooms in Butter
Julia Child kept most of her knives, including this 10-inch stainless-steel chef’s knife, on magnetic strips mounted above the kitchen sink. There they were within reach, while ensuring that after washing, the knives could be safely and easily stored, preserving their finely honed edges for another round of slicing, dicing, and chopping.
While Julia was a self-described “knife freak,” this week’s cook, Laura McClure, found she needed a trip to the knife store before starting her recipe.
READ THE FULL POST ON OUR BLOG for recipe sourcesSUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS AND STORIES of Sautéed Mushrooms—Posted by the National Museum of American History

Recipe #6: Sautéed Mushrooms in Butter

Julia Child kept most of her knives, including this 10-inch stainless-steel chef’s knife, on magnetic strips mounted above the kitchen sink. There they were within reach, while ensuring that after washing, the knives could be safely and easily stored, preserving their finely honed edges for another round of slicing, dicing, and chopping.

While Julia was a self-described “knife freak,” this week’s cook, Laura McClure, found she needed a trip to the knife store before starting her recipe.

READ THE FULL POST ON OUR BLOG for recipe sources

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS AND STORIES of Sautéed Mushrooms

—Posted by the National Museum of American History

Tags: vegetables |
8 September 09

Rustic Potato Loaves from Baking with Julia

Submitted by Laura

Here is another Julia Child related thing to do with mashed potatoes: Rustic Potato Loaves from Baking with Julia.  This bread comes together very quickly, but tastes like sourdough that was took hours to make. Just make sure that you let the bread cool thoroughly before cutting into it!

TODAY 1:42 PM
Recipe #4: Vinaigrette
Julia introduced the American public to a salad spinner, appearing on a French Chef episode holding an umbrella over her head while she spun the spinner in the sink, removing all the water from the lettuce. In Julia’s kitchen, her salad spinner sits on open shelving to the left of her sink, a convenient arrangement that reflects her belief that tools ought to be right at hand where they are used. We relate the salad spinner to this week’s recipe for vinaigrette because who wants to waste a beautiful emulsion of vinegar and oil on damp salad greens? This week, renovation program director Patrick Ladden shares his experience whipping up a seemingly simple vinaigrette. READ THE FULL POST ON OUR BLOG for recipe sourcesSUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS AND STORIES of vinaigrette—Posted by the National Museum of American History

Recipe #4: Vinaigrette

Julia introduced the American public to a salad spinner, appearing on a French Chef episode holding an umbrella over her head while she spun the spinner in the sink, removing all the water from the lettuce. In Julia’s kitchen, her salad spinner sits on open shelving to the left of her sink, a convenient arrangement that reflects her belief that tools ought to be right at hand where they are used. We relate the salad spinner to this week’s recipe for vinaigrette because who wants to waste a beautiful emulsion of vinegar and oil on damp salad greens?

This week, renovation program director Patrick Ladden shares his experience whipping up a seemingly simple vinaigrette.

READ THE FULL POST ON OUR BLOG for recipe sources

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS AND STORIES of vinaigrette

—Posted by the National Museum of American History
Tags: sauces | vegetables |
26 August 09

Julia and Paul Child

Submitted by Anthony

Your recipe mashed potatoes caught my attention. Some years ago, September 20, 1978. I photographed Julia and Paul Child in their home 104 Irving Street Cambridge, Massachusetts. I walked up to the door with only my camera bag and rang the bell. I was greeted by Paul, with his hand opened to me he said. Welcome, Tony. “Paul Child C,H,I,L,D NO- S”.  Well, I said to myself. This is reality.

Into the house we went and Paul introduced me to the writer and his wife Julia. The story was, “The Man Behind Julia Child”.

Paul is quite talented indeed, a fine painter.  And, a accomplished photographer as well. Paul had the same equipment that I was using that day. A Hasselblad medium format film camera.

Julia cooked “Chicken Diane” sauted with mushrooms and white wine. We also had a fresh crisp salad and POUILLY-FUSSE white wine from France. Paul was the wine connoisseur. Was it “GOOD” you ask? It was wonderful beyond your taste buds! I have photos also. Hope they go through OK.  CIAO! Anthony

24 August 09
Recipe #2: Mashed Potatoes
Julia Child’s kitchen contains an intriguing mix of old and new tools spanning well over half a century. If a tool worked, she used it. If it didn’t, she got rid of it. And if a new tool for doing something in the kitchen came along, she was the first to try it. Yet Julia was loyal to those tools that had worked for her and didn’t discard her trusty old implements just because new technology came on the scene. This is why a large potato ricer, bought in Germany in the mid-1950s, still hangs on her pegboard just a few feet away from the shiny blue “K-5A,” her Kitchen Aid stand mixer. She used both for making this week’s recipe—mashed potatoes. While the ricer was perfect for making small batches of mashed potatoes or other pureed vegetables, the electric mixer was the answer to mashing potatoes for a hungry Thanksgiving crowd. This week, project manager Nanci Edwards shares her experience of mashing potatoes—and discovering a bonus dish to make with the leftovers. READ THE FULL POST ON OUR BLOG for recipe sourcesSUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS AND STORIES of mashed potatoes —Posted by the National Museum of American History

Recipe #2: Mashed Potatoes

Julia Child’s kitchen contains an intriguing mix of old and new tools spanning well over half a century. If a tool worked, she used it. If it didn’t, she got rid of it. And if a new tool for doing something in the kitchen came along, she was the first to try it. Yet Julia was loyal to those tools that had worked for her and didn’t discard her trusty old implements just because new technology came on the scene. This is why a large potato ricer, bought in Germany in the mid-1950s, still hangs on her pegboard just a few feet away from the shiny blue “K-5A,” her Kitchen Aid stand mixer. She used both for making this week’s recipe—mashed potatoes. While the ricer was perfect for making small batches of mashed potatoes or other pureed vegetables, the electric mixer was the answer to mashing potatoes for a hungry Thanksgiving crowd.

This week, project manager Nanci Edwards shares her experience of mashing potatoes—and discovering a bonus dish to make with the leftovers.

READ THE FULL POST ON OUR BLOG for recipe sources

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS AND STORIES of mashed potatoes

Posted by the National Museum of American History
Tags: vegetables |